Skip to main content

Chennakeshava Temple: the Flamboyant Walls!


Part 5
Indian Bloggers
If the stone work inside the temple is beautiful, the outside is mesmerising. Walls and walls of carvings- scenes of war, scenes of courts & courtesans, scenes of song and dance, scenes of elephants and horses and other mythical beings.
And the recurring theme of the Hoysala symbol, of the Warrior and the fierce roaring lion. 
We spent quite a long time walking around the raised platform, on which the temple is built. There are many other smaller, pretty shrines and structures in the temple courtyard. Finally the heat slowly started getting to us, and we decided to sit for a while in the car, before heading on to Halebidu.
Miniature, shrine-like structures on either sides of the main entrance


Read also: Hoysala Grandeur: A Snapshot (Part 1)To Hassan (Part 2)To Hassan (Part 2)Chennakeshava Temple, Belur (Part 3)Inside the Chennakeshava Temple (Part 4)The Old Town: Halebidu (Part 6)The Drive to Mosale (Part 7)Mosale banthu Mosale (Part 8)Lakshmi Devi Temple, Doddagaddavalli (Part 9)Wall Art at Doddagaddavalli (Part 10)

Comments

  1. speechless, these type of architectural work always surprises me. you have captures very nicely.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Every statue saying a lot of words !!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. True, the sculptures have a thousand tales to tell!

      Delete
  3. Awesome sculptures!! HEre are some from Bangkok
    http://lensed.in/2016/03/guardian-figures-wat-pho-bangkok.html

    ReplyDelete
  4. South Indian temples, their unbeatable architecture and beautiful wall carvings are always my favourite one to explore. Thanks for sharing those wonderful pictures. :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you. Our country is filled with so countless such wonders!

      Delete

Post a Comment

Would you like to share your thoughts?

Insta-Me

Popular posts from this blog

Of Daivas and Spirits.

Spirit Worship: Jumadi-Banta Kola

I had earlier written a post titled Of Daivas and Spirits, about a custom indigenous to this part of the coast- Spirit Worship. As mentioned earlier, these spirits are many, including Panjurli, Varthe, Guliga, Jumadi - Banta, Mantradevate, etc. There is a very interesting story behind these spirits, which you can read HERE.
Of the many rituals conducted to appease the spirits, the most colourful (and glamorous) is conducting a Bhoota Kola. This is a night long ceremony to invoke the spirit(s) concerned, which then occupies an Oracle temporarily, and can even converse with people through a mediator. The Kola season lasts for about 4-5 months, i.e December to May. 
Earlier this year, we decided to visit a Kola held in at our village. This particular one is conducted in a grand manner every year, and is thronged by people of the surrounding villages. The spirits invoked are Jumadi - Banta. The place was beautifully decorated. Lot of musicians and drummers were involved. The silver headgear…

A Slice of the Western Ghats: AGUMBE

Agumbe is a tiny village in Shimoga district, and part of the eco-sensitive zone of the Western Ghats, the lifeline of the coast. The region receives very heavy rainfall, and is also referred to as the Cherrapunji of the South. The region has lush beautiful rain forests, and is also home to a number of unique flora and fauna, indigenous to the zone. The enigmatic King Cobra also resides in the in the thick rainforests.