Skip to main content

Old Port, Mangalore


With the arrival of June, fishing is suspended in the district. This helps in two ways- to help the fish breed in peace, and to prevent accidents in the stormy seas during the monsoons. The old port, which now serves as a harbour for the fishing boats that venture into the deep sea, is usually a buzzing place with lots of activity going on. However, in this season, it wears a pretty deserted look, as can be seen in the photos below. The amount and variety of fish available is also limited, as whatever little put up far sale comes from the little boats that don't go very far. We went to the old port today to pick some prawn. It was nice to watch the sky changing from a bright clear blue to dull cloudy grey, over a span of ten minutes. 


Comments

  1. The sky is beautiful to watch as it adorns different colors. Nice share here. :)

    ReplyDelete
  2. Very nice captures, can you parcel some fishes for me?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Haha, get the yourself at Mangalore harbour sometime!

      Delete
  3. Wow, nice pics Priyanka. Sincce two months I plan to write about Dakke but not doing so. Your post ispires me now.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Me too, infact these pictures were taken impromptu with my phone. Had been planning to take the camera and visit from years, but that never materialised!

      Delete
  4. Great pics. I like 2, 6 no pics.

    ReplyDelete
  5. And here in Rajasthan, same sky all day changing from pale yellow to dark yellow. Lol
    By the way great capture Priyanka!!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you so much. Yellow skies are very pretty too!

      Delete
  6. I love visiting ports, fish markets to get delve into the local culture; nice pics!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Me too. But how do tolerate the smell (assuming you're a non-fish eater)?

      Delete

Post a Comment

Would you like to share your thoughts?

Insta-Me

Popular posts from this blog

Of Daivas and Spirits.

Spirit Worship: Jumadi-Banta Kola

I had earlier written a post titled Of Daivas and Spirits, about a custom indigenous to this part of the coast- Spirit Worship. As mentioned earlier, these spirits are many, including Panjurli, Varthe, Guliga, Jumadi - Banta, Mantradevate, etc. There is a very interesting story behind these spirits, which you can read HERE.
Of the many rituals conducted to appease the spirits, the most colourful (and glamorous) is conducting a Bhoota Kola. This is a night long ceremony to invoke the spirit(s) concerned, which then occupies an Oracle temporarily, and can even converse with people through a mediator. The Kola season lasts for about 4-5 months, i.e December to May. 
Earlier this year, we decided to visit a Kola held in at our village. This particular one is conducted in a grand manner every year, and is thronged by people of the surrounding villages. The spirits invoked are Jumadi - Banta. The place was beautifully decorated. Lot of musicians and drummers were involved. The silver headgear…

A Slice of the Western Ghats: AGUMBE

Agumbe is a tiny village in Shimoga district, and part of the eco-sensitive zone of the Western Ghats, the lifeline of the coast. The region receives very heavy rainfall, and is also referred to as the Cherrapunji of the South. The region has lush beautiful rain forests, and is also home to a number of unique flora and fauna, indigenous to the zone. The enigmatic King Cobra also resides in the in the thick rainforests.